According to ITRC, 13 states (Alaska, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Vermont) regulate PFAS in drinking water through an MCL, screening level and/or action level. Some states, including New Jersey and Massachusetts, are now regulating PFAS in water discharges. Regulation of water discharges containing PFAS presents challenges due to … Continue Reading

As more states develop regulatory standards for PFAS, many are also recognizing that certain formulations of firefighting foams that were manufactured into the early 2000s or earlier contain legacy PFAS compounds, including Class B Aqueous Film-Forming Foams (AFFF), and that historic applications of these foams in training or in emergency response uses may have contributed to PFAS contamination in the … Continue Reading

The EPA has amended the Chemical Data Reporting rule, under the Toxic Substances Control Act, including revisions to reporting requirements, definition updates and an extension of the 2020 CDR submission period. Production of PFOA and PFOS is subject to CDR reporting.
In this alert, we outline the amendments and how they might affect your company’s obligations under TSCA.… Continue Reading

As we’ve discussed in prior posts, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have historically been an important component of aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) products that are used for training and fire suppression. As awareness of PFAS in AFFF has grown over the last several years, governments at the federal, state, and municipal level, as well as industry, have sought to … Continue Reading

The economic impact — both costs and benefits — of the issuance of low parts per trillion standards for nearly ubiquitous PFAS compounds is something that will become clearer as businesses, municipalities, water suppliers and communities act to comply with regulatory standards that require they test for and remove these substances down to trace levels in drinking water and environmental … Continue Reading

The Delaware General Assembly has recently introduced two PFAS-related bills. House Bill 337, introduced on May 29, 2020 and amended on June 16, 2020, would require the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control to develop maximum contaminant levels for drinking water contaminants, including PFOS and PFOA. Senate Bill 217, … Continue Reading

U. S. EPA has established a Health Advisory Level for PFOA and PFOS in drinking water of 70 parts per trillion (“ppt”). Several states are regulating PFAS at the low parts per trillion level. For example, on June 1, 2020, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection adopted maximum contaminant levels (“MCLs”) in drinking water for PFOA and PFOS of … Continue Reading

Earlier this year, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (“PADEP”) published for public comment its proposed update to the Chapter 250 regulations under the “Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act” – frequently referred to as Act 2. As part of its regulatory update, PADEP proposed to include remediation standards for three Per- and polyfluoroalkyl (“PFAS”) compounds – Perfluorooctanoic acid … Continue Reading

On June 1, 2020, NJDEP published its final rule (52 N.J.R. 1165(b)) setting drinking water standards, also known as maximum contaminant levels or “MCLs,” and final groundwater standards for the PFAS compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (“PFOA”) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (“PFOS”) pursuant to the New Jersey Safe Drinking Water Act, N.J.S.A. 58:12A-1, et seq., and the New Jersey Water Pollution Control … Continue Reading

One of the potential challenges with starting and completing site characterizations for PFAS compounds (in addition to the lack of approved cleanup standards for many of the environmental media) is the lack of approved and/or certified laboratory analytical methodologies, both at the federal and state levels (in many states), for media other than drinking water and groundwater.

As noted by … Continue Reading